What the world’s biggest superyachts can do

We’ve rounded up 10 of the worlds biggest superyachts — from an opulent superyacht capable of sailing “through cosmic fireball to celebrate the New Year in the Big Bang” to an Arctic-top billed as…

What the world's biggest superyachts can do

We’ve rounded up 10 of the worlds biggest superyachts — from an opulent superyacht capable of sailing “through cosmic fireball to celebrate the New Year in the Big Bang” to an Arctic-top billed as a “Gravel Murmur” — photographed in their entirety. Meet the crafts that make up the world’s biggest, most opulent, and most astronomically sprawling superyachts.

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Bruce Blackjets of Blackjets Yachts, Inc., said, “We wish to congratulate our clients for their strong financial and business decisions. These projects represent the superyacht era in a much more real-world way.”

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The “Gravel Murmur” is a 481-foot floating town dedicated to all things natural, with a wealth of functions and options for each party.

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The decks of this 2,106-foot vessel are primarily redwood, and its two-story aluminum superstructure provides endless space for a massive, throbbing, party-cruise (coupled with a double staircase for stand-up paddle boarding on the ship’s spiral staircase).

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The Archipelago has “very detailed and modern designs for an A4 vehicle that cannot be considered a yacht,” according to Mark McDowell, managing director of Wigan Group Ltd. It features much-desired roomy cabins, comfort, staterooms and public spaces.

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The collection of the J.R. Batley was seen in a dozen magazines, from Vogue (pictured) to the likes of the United Kingdom’s NOW (debuted a week ago), Australia’s Weekend West, and even Vanity Fair. Uniquely (and at over 14,000 passengers, a world record) it sets sail in a port of call style cruise with passengers entertained by onboard theatrics, live acoustic music and boisterous conga lines.

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The Sagamore (pictured) is a 2,102-foot center-prowled cruiser that’s powered by a twin turbo-electric main engine and an acceleration clock that reaches a top speed of 35 knots. The “living-space features live shows and, of course, a swimming pool.”

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The “Wiser” is super regal, sparkling in the sun on hand to let you look like a member of the Monarchy. The interior is opulent, grandiose, and lush in sophisticated, traditional British ways.

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The Seabourn, one of a new series of Seabourn line luxury cruise ships, is composed of 164 first-class and 142 executive cabins, per Seabourn. Each are “complete with mattresses, soaking tubs, showers and oversized suites.” Enormous over-water sun decks are featured on all sides.

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It’s a swish stay on the “Diamond” for 180-foot-long MSC Muse, and full of intricate features that celebrate tradition, if anything more than the finish.

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Every sophisticated, luxurious aspect of this one was absorbed into the “Megacon,” according to Raffles shipboard. With the illustrious Movenpick being the “theme restaurant” of the ship and the European design influenced by “Napoleon Bonaparte and Swiss colonial style,” most of the modern features have been done in an attempt to blend itself in with the environment.

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Paired with “one of the world’s most advanced and sophisticated ships,” “the 21st Century Zero” floats in calm waters of a delightful location called Minden’s Hüe Island. Boat enthusiasts will find much to like in this new, high-tech, 360-degree ultra-luxury yacht.

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The arctic-top “Velshi-Ya is named after Danish Captain Roald Valshi, who completed “the first sea passage to the North Pole when the ship was from Denmark, 1962. With today’s technology, it would cost over $4 billion to construct and travel to the same destination in such a time period.

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