The business driving frozen animal parts sales is the world’s first cold storage service

Do you remember the fridge in your fifth-grade science class? Well, now that you’re older you might be able to rest easy knowing that humans have kept some of their old, student projects alive…

The business driving frozen animal parts sales is the world’s first cold storage service

Do you remember the fridge in your fifth-grade science class? Well, now that you’re older you might be able to rest easy knowing that humans have kept some of their old, student projects alive for nearly a century.

But what about baby’s blood? Or a portion of a newborn’s intestines?

That’s where Nigerian entrepreneur and tech whiz Omololu Awosika comes in. He’s the mastermind behind the country’s first cold storage service that allows shoppers to buy frozen or dead animal parts, such as its animals. Awosika started the new enterprise when farmers couldn’t access the refrigerated supply at their local banks because of dwindling funding. Awosika already offered services for vegetable and other, less dangerous, meat products, but after opening cold storage sales, the now 10-employee company is quickly growing.

“Buyers started buying and refrigerating their refrigerator or freezer in order to bring back fresh and frozen meat. Other people started buying meat they used to throw away, and bringing to frozen storage and freezing it to keep them fresh. And also, even it may be nothing, it will help the seller’s business.”

Omololu has international aspirations, adding the air plans among services where it will be selling air transportation services.

On seeing their customers’ endless excitement to consume ingredients they’d not had the opportunity to consume before or the order for additional business from other side-tracked businesses, Awosika says, “I’ve sometimes asked ‘why would you want to eat a free animal’? They say they need to eat it but they don’t know what to do with it.” Awosika says so far the reverse has also happened. “What we see happening is that you see such a good-looking plate and, the next day, you see the same plate, same ingredients, at a different place.”

As of now, Awosika is limited to having just one store at the moment, but plans to open another soon. As for his business goals, Awosika says, “The number one goal right now is to get a balance of both farmer and business owners to make sure they understand what we do, and what it’s about and what our expectations are for them. That also means better prices for the suppliers, better pricing for the farmers and another thing is better prices for customers.”

Read the full story at The Atlantic Cities.

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