Investigative Report: From Trash to Burial Sites, Lives of Canadians Continue to Rivet To the Renew

Canadian security analysts are predicting a huge spike in crime in the wake of a $3.5 million waste-management contract not only that has never been bid on by the public, but that will allow…

Investigative Report: From Trash to Burial Sites, Lives of Canadians Continue to Rivet To the Renew

Canadian security analysts are predicting a huge spike in crime in the wake of a $3.5 million waste-management contract not only that has never been bid on by the public, but that will allow private companies to collect garbage for Toronto for the next 20 years.

Private waste management companies in Toronto have contracts that expire in 2021. Those contracts would have been lucrative contracts for these companies to win. But in a bid to satisfy Mayor John Tory and get him to sign off on the privatization of waste management operations, the city issued the last permit to these companies to do business in August.

The Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change allowed the use of private trash haulers. “TTC [Toronto Transit Commission] will increase the waste stream going to existing private firms through the end of 2020. As part of the overall review of waste services, TTC officials are working with the City and three independent waste management companies to build a robust formal process for new private haulers,” reads the August agreement.

But the resulting report, published in the Sept. 25 issue of the Canadian security journal Patrocinio, authored by Kevin Thomson, Steve Lewis and Chris Adamson, does not show this is what the city wanted. Rather than introducing a serious bidding process, it becomes the private companies who became competitors with the TTC who would ultimately monopolize a lucrative business.

When it comes to the content of a high-profile piece of legislation that makes Canadian privacy law relevant to cybersecurity, this bill will have no notable impact, the authors contend, but instead it makes Canadian organizations more vulnerable.

The CEO of cloud storage company Alibaba told colleagues in April 2017 that Huawei, the Chinese communications and telecoms conglomerate, may be worthy of American surveillance, but don’t worry about EU citizens because of Germany.

Berlin prosecutors subsequently dropped the case, according to Reuters, but in the case of Mr. Junaid Babar, the Ministry of Defence reportedly has authority over exporting Huawei equipment to third countries. Private security analyst Evan Hamburger told Fox News that whether or not this are a way the Trudeau government is using to spy on European citizens, “That is one of the things that we’re looking into.”

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