Here’s what you need to know about the WABI-19 vaccine

Two weeks ago, in the wee hours of August 4, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee declared the WABI-19 vaccine-preventable disease outbreak to be an emergency. Since then, many other states have issued similar declarations, and…

Here’s what you need to know about the WABI-19 vaccine

Two weeks ago, in the wee hours of August 4, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee declared the WABI-19 vaccine-preventable disease outbreak to be an emergency.

Since then, many other states have issued similar declarations, and the outbreak has gained new urgency. There are 42 states plus D.C. that allow or require that children six months old or younger receive the vaccine that forms the basis of these declarations.

Here’s what you need to know about the WABI-19 vaccine:

Why is the WABI-19 vaccine called COVID-19?

Children who lack the WABI-19 vaccination are at a far greater risk of contracting a virus that causes “rubella,” a highly contagious virus that’s highly dangerous to adults. It’s been linked to a higher incidence of cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

What is rubella?

Rubella is a smallpox-like virus, with symptoms that include mottled skin, red eyes, and mild fever. The virus spreads through the air from person to person, especially through children and young adults. Adults can contract rubella by being in close contact with a child who is infected with rubella.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the WABI-19 vaccination?

The WABI-19 vaccine offers protection from two viruses: rubella and whooping cough. Because most adults who are immunized against rubella are only protected against one virus, the WHO recommends that all those not immunized against rubella receive the WABI-19 vaccine before the age of six months.

Since children in the United States are most susceptible to whooping cough, the WHO recommends that young children receive the WHO-approved vaccines as an early protection against this highly contagious disease. The WHO explains that most people who get whooping cough “lose the ability to speak and are likely to lapse into unconsciousness. In some cases, children may die from this disease.”

Children who do not get the WABI-19 vaccine are at higher risk of whooping cough. In recent years, more than 36,000 new cases of whooping cough have been reported in the United States each year, with the highest numbers being in newborn babies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

How will the COVID-19 vaccine be licensed?

The WABI-19 vaccine will be licensed for use by the FDA.

How can I get the WABI-19 vaccine?

The vaccine is intended for children and young adults who are at high risk of acquiring or becoming infected with an enterovirus (a cousin of rubella) as well as whooping cough. It is not recommended for children under 12 years of age, babies younger than six months, or women who are at least 17 years old.

How do I know if I need to get the WABI-19 vaccine?

There are three ways you can determine if you are or will be immunized. A vaccine card should be given to your doctor for immunization purposes, as should a quote card as well as a copy of your personal immunization record (when available). The card should specify that the immunization is recommended by the CDC and must be given before any new immunizations. Immunization cards may be found on the HHS website or at your local health center.

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