Georgetown needs its point guard — and nobody’s asking who’s going to start.

After being forced out in disgrace, Russell Futrell returned to Georgetown to seek his place on the Hoyas’ bench. On Friday night against Missouri, he will start his first game of the season. Meanwhile,…

Georgetown needs its point guard — and nobody’s asking who’s going to start.

After being forced out in disgrace, Russell Futrell returned to Georgetown to seek his place on the Hoyas’ bench. On Friday night against Missouri, he will start his first game of the season. Meanwhile, Thanasis Antetokounmpo, after returning from the West Indies to join Milwaukee, has already played eight games.

Both of these men — the former on the Hilltop and the latter at home in Wisconsin — will be introduced to a nation as coaches Wednesday as the NCAA holds its “Men’s Basketball Coaches Showcase” at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center.

The stakes could not be higher. For the first time since 2008, no teams from the Eastern time zone will be representing the Big Dance. The semifinals will pit Drexel against Arkansas and Cincinnati against Providence. West Virginia, a perfect, 12-0 team, and Nevada, a wire-to-wire No. 1, join the Pac-12 in waiting. Another No. 1 seed, Virginia, will hope for a return trip to the Final Four.

While that may be on Coach Mike Daum’s mind, let’s focus on something else: the unspoken debate at Georgetown: who should start at point guard?

The answer: Who cares?

Dave Leitao replaced Kaleb Tarczewski, Aaron Bowen and LJ Peak, then considered to be the best trio of guards in school history, at the end of the 2016-17 season. Futrell played spot minutes behind two of the NCAA’s all-time leaders in scoring and assists.

But Hoops Haven has also noticed that Futrell has been less than effective.

Now, to be fair, all three shot around 46 percent from the field last season. Futrell, playing in place of the injured Bowen, shot 45 percent.

The timing might be right. Junior Donte Ingram is out until late November because of a concussion. Walker Wood, who injured his foot in a recent scrimmage, started in his place Friday against Columbia. Wood started 13 games last season, but was not given the starting nod until the fourth-to-last game.

And freshman Prince Ibeh has proven to be far more effective than any one of the most talented and heralded guards in school history.

One problem: after being out the past two years, Tarczewski, while the No. 1-rated recruit in school history, is in the midst of a career year. During Saturday’s exhibition victory over Babson, Tarczewski scored 17 points and grabbed 14 rebounds in 24 minutes.

The argument could go that when Tarczewski was healthy, he was simply too good to bench, anyway. That said, Faison is still one of the top guards in the ACC. So there is some value to Tarczewski being out of the starting lineup for a game or two.

One possible solution: Tarczewski and Ibeh were traded after the 2017-18 season. He was sent to Memphis and Shavar Newkirk moved up to the point guard position. Futrell was moved to the bench.

That left Wood, Ingram and D’Vauntes Smith-Rivera — three players who averaged between 5.1 and 9.6 points last season — as the only holdovers from the Futrell-Smith-Rivera band. Wood started six games last season.

That also leaves how Futrell fits in with these talented veterans.

As I told my Post colleague, Bob Condotta, last month, even with Futrell playing there would be questions from fans about how effective he is. The point guard is often asked to put up the shot, make the pass, operate the offense with his dribble. Futrell, a 5-foot-11, 168-pound guard, hasn’t done it yet.

Still, he could end up starting soon, depending on how the big names perform. Daum, Smith-Rivera and Ibeh are three of the Big East’s top four scorers. Ibeh, who averages 21.2 points per game, showed his star power in a close loss to Duke in the exhibition tournament.

Either way, nobody has really cared who starts at point guard. The question is what happens if those minutes are gone, if this lineup splits and isn’t great. If this lineup doesn’t win the Big East, it isn’t going anywhere.

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